Developers of the Shetty medical tourism hospital plan to build it on a site that was earmarked for an East End seaport development that has been scrapped.

Gene Thompson, local director of the Narayana group that proposes building the 2,000-bed hospital, and Joseph Imparato, owner of the land, said an agreement had been reached to locate Dr. Devi Shetty’s Narayana Cayman University Medical Centre on a 600-acre site. The $2 billion medical centre is to be built in stages during the next 15 years, with the first phase consisting of 140 beds. The developers of the hospital say the site is an ideal one for the project as it is big enough to allow for future expansion for the hospital and its related infrastructure needs. Work on the hospital site will begin later this year

Premier McKeeva Bush commented, “I believe that the advent of the Shetty hospital bodes well. It is one of the most significant to happen in this country for years. Caymanians will be able to care there. I believe that site is one of the best sites available on the island.”

For road access to the hospital, the government intends to go ahead as planned to build an east-west corridor from George Town to East End only when Cayman has the money to do so, but not yet. The developers of the Shetty hospital will have to pay for and build its own feeder roads to the site, just like any other developer.

Captain Bryan Ebanks of the Save Cayman campaign is worried about the Shetty hospital and is concerned that that the laws of Cayman had been changed on the request of Dr. Shetty, as this sets a precedent for future investors and developers.

The Cayman Islands government passed a number of laws to help pave the way for the establishment of the hospital, including the Health Practice Law, which enables medical staff trained in India and other overseas countries to practise in Cayman; the Tax Concessions (Amendment) Law, which exempts companies from potential future taxes; and the Medical Negligence (Non-Economic Damages) (Amendment) Law, which caps pain and suffering damages awarded in medical malpractice cases to $500,000. A final piece of legislation, which will allow human organ and tissue donations and transplants to be done in Cayman, is being drafted and is expected to be tabled later this year.  

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